Pharmaceutical Returns Service - Comprehensive, Cost Effective and Conscientious

Tips on Maximzing Returns

  1. Return your outdates to our facility every four to six months. Pulling your outdates three to four months in advance will guarantee the highest dollar volume on your returns.

  2. Leave your price labels on the Rx bottles. We calculate return dollars based on your acquisition cost, making our credit estimates very accurate. Without the label, we have to quote Redbook or WAC prices, which are not a true reflection of your acquisition cost.

  3. Check the expiration date before you open a new bottle. If it is close to expiration put it in the returns box and open a more recently purchased Rx item.

  4. Generic items are often not returnable once they are opened. For open generics then, keep them on your shelf until they expire, and always check the expiration date before opening any Generic Rx items.

  5. When pulling your outdates for your next return, do not forget to check your Class II’s for expired items. Neglecting to return these Class II items can be a serious loss of return dollars.

  6. Do not mix same type of product from different containers. Blending pharmaceuticals to save space can negate the return eligibility. Containers that are returned with more than the original quantity can often cause loss of credit.

  7. It is good to make note of those manufacturers who do not accept returns where the quantity is below 25% or even 50% of the original package. It may help to return an item when it is close to the minimal quantity and open a newer Rx bottle. (Some 25% minimum Manufacturers are Lilly, Solvay, Wallace, Pfizer, Warner Chilcott, Organon, Schering, Shire, and Watson. 50% minimum Manufacturers are Bertek and Mylan). Call and ask your representative for a complete list of these Manufacturers.

  8. Make sure you tighten lids well. Loose tablets are often lost and liquids that leak can nullify many items in a return job.

  9. When shipping, using loose packing materials such as shredded paper or peanuts can cause problems. If you use these materials, always bag them first.